WELCOME ABOARD — TRUE THE MAGAZINE®
Be a Napa Winemaker (Remainder)
Be a Napa Winemaker (Remainder)
$400.00

True Supply

Be a Napa Winemaker (Remainder)

Join us for an unprecedented harvest weekend in Napa Valley as we pick and press our first vintage of True Cabernet. Our host is Seth Cripe, a True member and founder of LOLA Wines, who will teach us the finer points of mastering California’s most noble grape, along with a bacchanalian line-up of wine tastings and chef-driven feasts. Total price: $675 per person. Deposit: $250. 

 

Harvest Weekend (October 12th, 13th, 2018)

Welcome Reception, Friday Night. 

After making our way to wine country, we’ll meet up for a welcome reception under the canopy of palm trees and in the patio of Seth’s LOLA House, in the heart of Calistoga. We’ll have a chef on hand preparing some gastronomic delights featuring the best ingredients of the harvest, the always prevalent dose of primo grade Santa Maria Island bottarga (Seth will discuss) and get into our first wine tasting groove. After a few toasts, Seth will break down the importance of Cabernet in the region and the pedigree of the wines we’ll be picking.

Saturday, October 13th.

We’ll start our day as winemakers do: in the cool of the early morning. Before the sun rises, dehydrating the grapes, we’ll learn the art of the pick from Seth and his team. Picking grapes is part of a winemaker’s passion, and we’ll fill our baskets, and head over to the winery for pressing. After. we'll settle into a traditional lunch in the vineyard and start our day’s tasting.

After a packed morning, we’ll retreat, refresh and head on over to the mud bath house at Dr. Wilkinson’s, a Calistoga institution, for a full body dip. Due to the high quality of ingredients, the Napa Valley is home to some of the country’s most award-winning restaurants, and we’re leaving Saturday night open for members that want to make reservations and have a night out. (We'll provide recommendations.)

Sunday, October 14th.

One of Seth’s favorite traditions is taking new guests on a hike with his dogs. For those who want to join, he’ll be leading an early morning hike up the valley. We’ll then fade back to Lola House for a farewell brunch (prepare for more bottarga) and final wine tasting, featuring a few fellow local winemakers, and conclude with a new (and surprise) True tradition.

Our Vintage

The word sauvignon in French derives from the word savage, and the origins of our noble grape are believed to have come from a pairing between Cabernet France and Sauvignon Blanc in the Bordeaux region of France. Other wine historians believe the varietal harkened back to Roman times, and the hardy, sturdy nature of Cabernet vines were toasted by Pliny The Elder. (“In Vino Veritas,” Pliny famously said. In wine there is truth.) 

In modern days, there’s no arguing Cabernet - and specifically Napa Valley Cabernet - has emerged as a king of full-bodied reds. A combination of volcanic soil, dry climate and ambitious winemakers led to the pivotal event in the late 1970’s, when French wine critics declared some Napa vintages better in quality than the best reds from Bordeaux. An ongoing war between the old school French wines and techniques and enterprising, big bodied, Cadillac-style California cabs has ensued ever since.

Napa Cabernet is different than other California Cabernets, often resulting in stronger structure, more pronounced flavor and far superior aging quality. Costing over $200 a bottle for name producers at restaurants and re-sold at far higher price points after aging, Napa Cabernets are designed for the cellar, and uncorking for special occasions.

“The pure experience here is to experience the vintage,” Cripe says. “You uncork a bottle every five years, and you can see how the wine changes and evolves as it ages. That’s the magic of mother nature at work!”

We’ll be picking a ton of grapes - literally. For our vintage, we’ll have about fifty cases for members, which amounts to only a few hundred bottles. To secure your case or bottles, head over here.

The Vines

The vines we’ll be picking from are among the oldest in Napa Valley, and first planted in 1904. At the time, Napa had yet to become a destination for wine, and its rich soil attracted farmers like the Heitz family, who had immigrated to the States from Alsace, a town in northern France. 

Before re-locating to Napa, Michael Heitz, the family patriarch, had been working as a gardener in the cemeteries of San Francisco. But he found refuge and solace in the picturesque Napa Valley, and started planting vines.

The land they purchased was located at the base of Diamond Mountain, just two and a half miles south of the town of Calistoga (and now next to an esteemed circle of neighbors including producers Sterling, Clos Pegase and Schramsberg). 

Harvesting the grapes for personal consumption, the Heitz family eventually refined their practice, selling small batches and a limited amount of cases. The winery survived the Great Depression and Prohibition, several fires and the turbulences and fads of the wine industry. 

Last year, the winery formed a partnership with Seth Cripe, an artisanal wine producer and founder of LOLA wines in Calistoga, to harvest a part of the vineyard to produce a limited series of Cabernet Sauvignon. We’ll be following the same path this year, hand-picking the vines and pressing the grapes to produce our first True vintage.

The Experience

Harvest Weekend (October 12th, 13th, 2018)

Welcome Reception, Friday Night. 

After making our way to wine country, we’ll meet up for a welcome reception under the canopy of palm trees and in the patio of Seth’s LOLA House, in the heart of Calistoga. We’ll have a chef on hand preparing some gastronomic delights featuring the best ingredients of the harvest, the always prevalent dose of primo grade Santa Maria Island bottarga (Seth will discuss) and get into our first wine tasting groove. After a few toasts, Seth will break down the importance of Cabernet in the region and the pedigree of the wines we’ll be picking.

Saturday, October 13th.

We’ll start our day as winemakers do: in the cool of the early morning. Before the sun rises, dehydrating the grapes, we’ll learn the art of the pick from Seth and his team. Picking grapes is part of a winemaker’s passion, and we’ll fill our baskets, and head over to the winery for pressing. After. we'll settle into a traditional lunch in the vineyard and start our day’s tasting.

After a packed morning, we’ll retreat, refresh and head on over to the mud bath house at Dr. Wilkinson’s, a Calistoga institution, for a full body dip. Due to the high quality of ingredients, the Napa Valley is home to some of the country’s most award-winning restaurants, and we’re leaving Saturday night open for members that want to make reservations and have a night out. (We'll provide recommendations.)

Sunday, October 14th.

One of Seth’s favorite traditions is taking new guests on a hike with his dogs. For those who want to join, he’ll be leading an early morning hike up the valley. We’ll then fade back to Lola House for a farewell brunch (prepare for more bottarga) and final wine tasting, featuring a few fellow local winemakers, and conclude with a new (and surprise) True tradition.

Our Vintage

The word sauvignon in French derives from the word savage, and the origins of our noble grape are believed to have come from a pairing between Cabernet France and Sauvignon Blanc in the Bordeaux region of France. Other wine historians believe the varietal harkened back to Roman times, and the hardy, sturdy nature of Cabernet vines were toasted by Pliny The Elder. (“In Vino Veritas,” Pliny famously said. In wine there is truth.) 

In modern days, there’s no arguing Cabernet - and specifically Napa Valley Cabernet - has emerged as a king of full-bodied reds. A combination of volcanic soil, dry climate and ambitious winemakers led to the pivotal event in the late 1970’s, when French wine critics declared some Napa vintages better in quality than the best reds from Bordeaux. An ongoing war between the old school French wines and techniques and enterprising, big bodied, Cadillac-style California cabs has ensued ever since.

Napa Cabernet is different than other California Cabernets, often resulting in stronger structure, more pronounced flavor and far superior aging quality. Costing over $200 a bottle for name producers at restaurants and re-sold at far higher price points after aging, Napa Cabernets are designed for the cellar, and uncorking for special occasions.

“The pure experience here is to experience the vintage,” Cripe says. “You uncork a bottle every five years, and you can see how the wine changes and evolves as it ages. That’s the magic of mother nature at work!”

We’ll be picking a ton of grapes - literally. For our vintage, we’ll have about fifty cases for members, which amounts to only a few hundred bottles. To secure your case or bottles, head over here.

The Vines

The vines we’ll be picking from are among the oldest in Napa Valley, and first planted in 1904. At the time, Napa had yet to become a destination for wine, and its rich soil attracted farmers like the Heitz family, who had immigrated to the States from Alsace, a town in northern France. 

Before re-locating to Napa, Michael Heitz, the family patriarch, had been working as a gardener in the cemeteries of San Francisco. But he found refuge and solace in the picturesque Napa Valley, and started planting vines.

The land they purchased was located at the base of Diamond Mountain, just two and a half miles south of the town of Calistoga (and now next to an esteemed circle of neighbors including producers Sterling, Clos Pegase and Schramsberg). 

Harvesting the grapes for personal consumption, the Heitz family eventually refined their practice, selling small batches and a limited amount of cases. The winery survived the Great Depression and Prohibition, several fires and the turbulences and fads of the wine industry. 

Last year, the winery formed a partnership with Seth Cripe, an artisanal wine producer and founder of LOLA wines in Calistoga, to harvest a part of the vineyard to produce a limited series of Cabernet Sauvignon. We’ll be following the same path this year, hand-picking the vines and pressing the grapes to produce our first True vintage.