True Hacienda (Día de los Muertos-Deposit)
True Hacienda (Día de los Muertos-Deposit)
True Hacienda (Día de los Muertos-Deposit)
True Hacienda (Día de los Muertos-Deposit)
True Hacienda (Día de los Muertos-Deposit)
True Hacienda (Día de los Muertos-Deposit)
$200.00

True Supply

True Hacienda (Día de los Muertos-Deposit)

Día de los Muertos is among the holiest rituals in Mexico. Join us at our partner hacienda, a 15th century castle in the colonial highlands, to learn and celebrate the way of the ancients. (Reserve one of the limited spots with this $200 deposit. Full price = $875.)  

We’ll be returning to hacienda this year (November 1st to November 3rd), and inviting a small number of Lucky Piece Holders to join us for Día de los Muertos, with the mission of studying ancient skills and partaking in the rituals of another era. Tlaxcala province, about two hours east of Mexico City, is among the oldest, rarely explored and smallest states of Mexico. A pre-Aztecan community known for the variety of its corn and the quality of pulque, a fermented potion made from the area’s monstrous maguey plants, Tlaxcala is home to our partner hacienda. The 15th century castle has been artfully restored into a bed and breakfast, and sits in the shadow of the impressive Malinche volcano.

Thursday, November 1st

We’ll be greeting members with refreshments and showing you your quarters inside the hacienda, just in time for a welcome dinner under the candelabras and inside the old castle’s cavernous stone dining room. After several toasts and a traditional, multi-course meal (and perhaps a game or two of eight ball on the billiard table) we’ll head to the cemetery in San Isidro de Buen Sucseso, a nearby village known for its Día de los Muertos festivities. Families will be spending the night here, and we’ll be wandering the grounds, taking in the cultural immersion.

Friday, November 2nd

Breakfast at Javi’s Hacienda is its own occasion, with freshly baked bread each morning, a melange of fresh juices, local honey and jams, egg and tortilla dishes, yogurt and granola. After some relax time for passengers recovering from their trip and morning nourishment, we’ll head to the Hacienda’s capilla, or chapel, to contract our True Ofrende, or altar. We’ll be guided and inspired by locals, but adding our own variations as we see fit.

In the afternoon, we’ll split up into groups. The first group will be led by Javi and venture into a temazcal, a traditional sweat lodge and one in which he designed and built himself. It’s a two hour sweat at high heat, featuring ceremonial songs and customs, designed to give the body a re-birth.

Our second group will be lead by Don Abram, an artisanal maker of pulque, a fermented nectar of the maguey plant and considered a choice beverage by ancient gods. Don Abram is a master of his craft, honed over generations, and we’ll see his prized plants and sample his refreshing homebrew.

Reuniting at the hacienda, we’ll pit stop in the kitchen to nosh on a few snacks and learn the art of making mole, the prized Mexican sauce containing no fewer than sixteen individual ingredients. A siesta is optional (if not recommended) before we head out into Huamantla, another pueblo, for a group dinner at a prized restaurant and a night on the town.

Saturday, November 3

The market in Tlaxcala, the capital city of the province and charming colonial town, is known for its fresh produce and handmade textiles. We’ll take a tour, and head out into the city to check out its annual contest of ofrendes, or altars, lining the central square.

The feria, or fiesta, of Tlaxcala will be in full bloom, with dancing and music in the streets and some of Spain’s best matadors arriving for the occasion. For those interested, we’ll be securing tickets to the bullfight and hosting a traditional lunch meal at Meson Taurino, one of the city’s best restaurants and a place that’s sure to be packed with aficionados devouring the region’s famed gusanos de maguey, or sautéed worms, along with escamoles, or ant larvae, a delicacy known as the Mexican caviar. The restaurant is also know for its large and succulent steaks, and spreads that accommodate twenty or thirty at once.

After the bullfight, we’ll head back to the Hacienda for our final night. We have a surprise planned — sorry, can’t and won’t reveal —but plan on a fun and festive evening. Plenty of time to sleep on the plane or in when we bid our final goodbyes in the morning.

Transportation

We’ll have transportation available to and from the airports in Mexico City, about two hours away, or Puebla, about a forty minute drive. Our driver will bring you directly from the airport arrivals to the stone arches of the hacienda. Return trips are also available.

The Experience

We’ll be returning to hacienda this year (November 1st to November 3rd), and inviting a small number of Lucky Piece Holders to join us for Día de los Muertos, with the mission of studying ancient skills and partaking in the rituals of another era. Tlaxcala province, about two hours east of Mexico City, is among the oldest, rarely explored and smallest states of Mexico. A pre-Aztecan community known for the variety of its corn and the quality of pulque, a fermented potion made from the area’s monstrous maguey plants, Tlaxcala is home to our partner hacienda. The 15th century castle has been artfully restored into a bed and breakfast, and sits in the shadow of the impressive Malinche volcano.

Thursday, November 1st

We’ll be greeting members with refreshments and showing you your quarters inside the hacienda, just in time for a welcome dinner under the candelabras and inside the old castle’s cavernous stone dining room. After several toasts and a traditional, multi-course meal (and perhaps a game or two of eight ball on the billiard table) we’ll head to the cemetery in San Isidro de Buen Sucseso, a nearby village known for its Día de los Muertos festivities. Families will be spending the night here, and we’ll be wandering the grounds, taking in the cultural immersion.

Friday, November 2nd

Breakfast at Javi’s Hacienda is its own occasion, with freshly baked bread each morning, a melange of fresh juices, local honey and jams, egg and tortilla dishes, yogurt and granola. After some relax time for passengers recovering from their trip and morning nourishment, we’ll head to the Hacienda’s capilla, or chapel, to contract our True Ofrende, or altar. We’ll be guided and inspired by locals, but adding our own variations as we see fit.

In the afternoon, we’ll split up into groups. The first group will be led by Javi and venture into a temazcal, a traditional sweat lodge and one in which he designed and built himself. It’s a two hour sweat at high heat, featuring ceremonial songs and customs, designed to give the body a re-birth.

Our second group will be lead by Don Abram, an artisanal maker of pulque, a fermented nectar of the maguey plant and considered a choice beverage by ancient gods. Don Abram is a master of his craft, honed over generations, and we’ll see his prized plants and sample his refreshing homebrew.

Reuniting at the hacienda, we’ll pit stop in the kitchen to nosh on a few snacks and learn the art of making mole, the prized Mexican sauce containing no fewer than sixteen individual ingredients. A siesta is optional (if not recommended) before we head out into Huamantla, another pueblo, for a group dinner at a prized restaurant and a night on the town.

Saturday, November 3

The market in Tlaxcala, the capital city of the province and charming colonial town, is known for its fresh produce and handmade textiles. We’ll take a tour, and head out into the city to check out its annual contest of ofrendes, or altars, lining the central square.

The feria, or fiesta, of Tlaxcala will be in full bloom, with dancing and music in the streets and some of Spain’s best matadors arriving for the occasion. For those interested, we’ll be securing tickets to the bullfight and hosting a traditional lunch meal at Meson Taurino, one of the city’s best restaurants and a place that’s sure to be packed with aficionados devouring the region’s famed gusanos de maguey, or sautéed worms, along with escamoles, or ant larvae, a delicacy known as the Mexican caviar. The restaurant is also know for its large and succulent steaks, and spreads that accommodate twenty or thirty at once.

After the bullfight, we’ll head back to the Hacienda for our final night. We have a surprise planned — sorry, can’t and won’t reveal —but plan on a fun and festive evening. Plenty of time to sleep on the plane or in when we bid our final goodbyes in the morning.

Transportation

We’ll have transportation available to and from the airports in Mexico City, about two hours away, or Puebla, about a forty minute drive. Our driver will bring you directly from the airport arrivals to the stone arches of the hacienda. Return trips are also available.